Pasta

Pasta

Handcut Lemon Pappardelle + Rosemary Breadcrumbs

Handcut Lemon Pappardelle + Rosemary Breadcrumbs | www.hungryinlove.com

If the flavor profile here looks suspiciously similar to my last post (lemon + rosemary + a carby canvas) then you got me. Even though it's officially spring I'm not ready to let go of cold weather fare. Reason #1: the good spring things (rhubarb, peas, morels) have yet to hit the farmer's markets. And reason #2: buttery noodles know no season.

Have you ever been out to dinner with a small child and been super envious when their noodles and butter arrive? You probably ordered something way soigné with lots of color and delicate portions. But you don't care. You just want that pasta and maybe a little cheese to sprinkle on top. We've all been there. Such an episode inspired me to make this pasta last weekend. The lemon and herbs and general effort level though I'd say sufficiently adultify it.

Eggs | www.hungryinlove.com
Flour | www.hungryinlove.com
Lemon Pasta | www.hungryinlove.com
Lemon Pasta | www.hungryinlove.com
Rosemary Garlic Butter | www.hungryinlove.com
Handcut Lemon Pasta + Rosemary Breadcrumbs | www.hungryinlove.com

I use Alice Waters' pasta dough recipe from The Art of Simple Food as the foundation for all my experiments. It's so simple you'll commit it to memory after your first go. The only adaptation I made here was to add the lemon zest.

Lemon Pasta

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • Zest of 2 lemons

Prep

  • In a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment combine all ingredients on low speed until dough comes together, about 1 minute. Dough should be slightly crumbly. Use you hands to test shaping it into a ball. If dough does not come together add a teaspoon of water and mix until combined. Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead a few times into a disc shape. Wrap tightly with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for one hour.
  • Unwrap dough and cut into four equal pieces. Use your hands to flatten each into a thin-ish rectangle.
  • Using a pasta maker, roll dough into thin sheets. I have the KitchenAid attachments and rolled to setting 5.
  • Flour sheets on both sides and cut in half. Each half will be the length of your noodles.
  • Roll half sheets up just as you'd roll up a carpet. Using a sharp knife cut noodles at once inch intervals. This is the width for a pappardelle but you could make your noodles wider or more narrow.
  • Unroll the noodles, lay out lengthwise, and dust with flour again.
  • Spin noodles into a nest and set aside until ready to cook.

 

Rosemary Breadcrumbs

Ingredients

  • A hunk of 1 or 2 day old crusty bread, cut into small cubes (if you're starting with fresh bread you can cut into cubes and dry out in an oven on low heat)
  • 2 Tbs butter
  • 2 cloves fresh garlic, peeled
  • 4 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • Sea salt

Prep

  • Place bread cubes in a gallon ziplock bag and lay flat on a cutting board with a dish towel spread on top.
  • Using a rolling pin, crush bread cubes into craggy crumbs. It's okay if some are smithereens and some are larger.
  • When you're ready to toast your breadcrumbs prepare a plate lined with a paper towel.
  • Place butter, rosemary, and garlic in a sauté pan and heat until butter has melted. Reduce heat to very low and allow flavors to infuse for five minutes or so. Take care not to let the butter burn.
  • Add breadcrumbs to sauté pan and toast over medium heat until breadcrumbs are nicely browned. Immediately transfer breadcrumbs to plate with paper towel and allow to drain and cool. Discard rosemary and garlic and sprinkle with sea salt.

To serve, cook pasta in salted boiling water for 5-6 minutes until al dente. Toss hot pasta with equal parts melted butter and lemon juice (about 1 Tbs of each per pasta serving). Garnish with breadcrumbs and cracked pepper. Serve immediately.

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Sea Food, Pasta

Cherrystones with Saffron + Fregola

Cherrystone Clams with Saffron + Fregola | www.hungryinlove.com

Happy Thanksgiving week, y'all! Every day I am #blessed with many things to be grateful for. Here's a sampling from this month.

1) After four(!) separate trips to the RMV I successfully had my father-in-law's low-number license plates transferred to me. Did you know people like low-number plates? I didn't know it was a thing until we so innocently said, "Sure, we'd like granddad's old plates." It was an epic adventure involving many RMV personalities. There were ogres and trolls who thwarted our mission and fairies and genies who ultimately made our wish come true. If you spot us on the road (#50517) know we earned those digits.

2) November marks my first blogiversary for this here site. By the numbers that's 36 posts, 47 recipes, ~200 hours diverted from Netflix binging, and too-many-to-count new friends. It's been such a fun hobby. Thank you to all for reading!

3) I rang in 31 on an unseasonably warm weekend with family from near and far, cupcakes delivered to my door, and a little 5K to counteract all the feasting. A success I'd say.

When you're done with all the obligatory cooking this week, have some fun and make clams in a brilliant yellow saffron sauce.  My friend and neighbor Julia at Formaggio Kitchen gave me some handy saffron-buying tips. Apparently yellow threads are filler for this very expensive spice. The good stuff will just have red threads. The more you know!

Cherrystone Clams with Saffron + Fregola | www.hungryinlove.com
Peeled Tomatoes | www.hungryinlove.com
Fegola | www.hungryinlove.com
Saffron Steeping | www.hungryinlove.com
Cherrystone Clams with Saffron + Fregola | www.hungryinlove.com
Cherrystones with Saffron + Fregola | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

Serves 2 as a main or 4 as a first course
  • 1 dozen cherrystone clams, rinsed and scrubbed clean
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 bulb fennel, cut into small dice (reserve fronds for garnish)
  • 1 shallot, diced
  • 1 clove garlic, diced
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • 2 tomatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 1 large pinch saffron
  • 1 cup fregola pasta
  • 1 1/2 cups water, divided

Prep

  • Peel the tomatoes by submerging in boiling water until skin splits (about 1 min). Remove with tongs and let sit until cool enough to handle. Slide skins off and discard. Remove core and roughly chop.
  • In heavy bottomed saucepan for which you have a lid, heat olive oil over medium high heat. Add chopped fennel, shallot, garlic, and salt. Saute for 4-6 minutes until vegetables have softened. Stir regularly taking care not to brown.
  • Add chopped tomatoes and cook for 1 minute.
  • Add wine and 1/2 cup water and bring to a boil. Reduce to low and cover. Simmer for 15 minutes.
  • Meanwhile cook the fregola and steep the saffron. Place saffron in a small bowl and pour in 1 cup boiling water. Let steep for at least 15 minutes. Cook fregola in salted boiling water until al dente (about 10-12 minutes). When pasta is done drain and set aside.
  • Add saffron and steeping liquid to your saucepan with the vegetables. Use an immersion blender to puree until smooth.
  • Return saucepan to your burner and add clams. Cover and cook over medium high heat for 10 minutes. Discard any clams that don't open.
  • Divide fregola among serving bowls and ladle clams and saffron broth on top. Garnish with reserved fennel fronds.

Pasta, Fixings

Pistachio Mint Pesto

Spaghetti + Pistachio Mint Pesto | www.hungryinlove.com

I don't have a good track record for remembering firsts. Pesto is a vivid exception. The scene was 9th grade - a 'pasta party'  at Christine C.'s house. In addition to the mandatory red sauce, Christine's mom also presented us with a platter of spaghetti all speckled green. I was intrigued.

For those who aren't familiar, a pasta party is an adorable ritual enjoyed by high school athletes. The evening before a game the whole team gathers at the home of one patient parent to eat heaps of pasta. The presumed logic being that carb-loading is imperative to peak performance the following day. It's entirely unnecessary and totally fun. Lots of inter-grade bonding and boy talk. I imagine this tradition has suffered in the era of gluten intolerance. If there are any high school readers out there I'd welcome a report.

Anyhow, I digress. I swiftly cornered Christine's mom and complimented the 'green stuff'.  She showed me an empty packet and explained that all you need to do is mix the contents with oil and presto, pesto! That night I relayed the discovery to my mom and made my case for partaking in this exotic delicacy. "Oh, your father doesn't like pesto." Womp womp. The ultimate veto. Reflecting on this memory, maybe my Dad didn't like pesto because his reference point was freeze-dried powder that came in a packet.

By college I had graduated to jarred pesto and understood that basil and pine nuts were essential common denominators. Then one fateful day a roommate demonstrated that any old combo of nuts + greens could yield a mighty pesto. I think her version featured arugula and walnuts. Fast forward many moons to this weekend where I found myself with a cupboard full of pistachios and mint aplenty due to the Easter holiday. A new duo, but why not? Even if only because it's documented here on the world wide web this is a first I won't soon forget.

Pesto Mise En Place | www.hungryinlove.com
Pistachio Mint Pesto | www.hungryinlove.com
Lime Zest + Olive Oil | www.hungryinlove.com
Spaghetti | www.hungryinlove.com
Spaghetti + Pistachio Mint Pesto | www.hungryinlove.com

pistachio Mint Pesto

Makes ~ 1.5 cups

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup unsalted, shelled pistachios
  • 2 cups mint leaves
  • 1/2 cup grated Pecorino Romano cheese
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 Tb. lime juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Pinch salt

Prep

  • Toast pistachios in a dry skillet over medium heat until just they are fragrant and just beginning to browm, 3-5 minutes; let cool
  • In a food processor combine pistachios, mint, cheese, lime zest,  garlic, and salt until you have a thick paste
  • With the motor running add olive oil and lime juice through the feed tube;  if pesto is too thick add water 1 Tbs. at a time until pesto reaches desired consistency
  • Keep pesto in the fridge for up to a week; also freezes well

 

Pasta

Butternut Squash Gnocchi

Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com

When Tripp and I got married I told him that there was one condition under which I would permit him to file for a divorce: in the event I develop a gluten intolerance. Before you start thinking he's a crummy guy, let me explain. It is I who would become intolerable. My relationship with bread, pasta, cake and the like can pretty much be summed up by this Mariah Carey song  ("You've got me feeling emotions / Deeper than I ever dreamed of / Now you know the way you make me lose control / When you're looking into my eyes.") I'm actually aghast that I haven't posted a pasta recipe on this blog yet. So here begins what will surely be a robust section of this site.

This gnocchi has a couple steps but it's worth it. You start with an old clunker of a squash and end up with delicate little butternut-colored pasta pillows.  It's a beautiful thing.

Butternut Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi Dough | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com
 Find the recipe for this  Parmesan Broth at BonAppetit .

Find the recipe for this Parmesan Broth at BonAppetit.

Butternut Squash Gnocchi

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups butternut squash puree (1 medium butternut squash + olive oil, salt, and pepper)
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg
  • Sage leaves
  • 4 Tbs. butter, divided
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 cup Parmesan Broth (we prepared this recipe from BonAppetit; if you don't feel like bothering with this, your pasta cooking water is a fine substitute)

Prep

Squash Puree

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees;
  • Cut butternut squash in half lengthwise and scoop out seeds
  • Place on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper
  • Roast until the flesh is easily pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes 
  • Scoop flesh out of squash and transfer to a food processor
  • Blend until smooth, 30-60 seconds; allow to cool; this may be done a day ahead (you may have a bit more than 1 1/2 cups - here are a few ideas from The Kitchn on how you can use any leftovers)

Gnocchi

  • In a mixing bowl, beat an egg into squash puree (use only 1 1/2 cups)
  • Gradually fold in flour (Note: dough will be soft. You want to add enough flour for the dough to just come together. If dough is still sticky after adding the full 2 cups of flour, continue adding one tablespoon at a time until it's workable.)
  • Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead gently until smooth
  • Using a sharp knife, cut dough into 8 equal sections
  • Take each section and using your palms roll into a long rope, about 1/2 inch thick
  • Cut the rope into 1/2 inch pieces and transfer the gnocchi to a floured surface (at this point you can pinch each gnocchi with the tines of a fork but I skipped this step)
  • Gnocchi may be used fresh or frozen; to freeze, spread gnocchi on a baking sheet so they are not touching and freeze until firm, about 1 hour; transfer frozen gnocchi to a zip lock bag for freezer storage

Sage Leaves

  • In a small saute pan heat 1 Tbs. butter and 1 Tbs. olive oil over medium heat
  • Add sage leaves (removed from stem) and fry 5-10 seconds until crisp - do not brown
  • Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and sprinkle with salt

Assembly

  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; have a large saute pan on another burner ready to go
  • Cook fresh gnocchi at a rolling boil until they float, about 3 minutes; remove gnocchi using a slotted spoon and drain
  • In a large saute pan, heat 3 Tbs. butter over medium heat
  • Once butter has melted, add cooked gnocchi and parmesan broth (substitute pasta cooking liquid if not using parmesan broth; you can also add a handful of finely grated parmesan at this step if you like)
  • Cook over medium high heat until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 5 minutes; the gnocchi will be lightly coated in sauce
  • Transfer gnocchi to serving dishes, garnish with fried sage leaves, and serve immediately