Vegetables

Salads, Vegetables

Spicy Cucumber Salad

Spicy Cucumber Salad | www.hungryinlove.com

Has anyone been to Momofuku? Visiting a David Chang restaurant has been on my short list for many moons. And a few weeks ago serendipity intervened. I was in DC for work and as the cab pulled up to my hotel, I spied a telltale electric pink 'milk' sign belonging to Momofuku CCDC just across the way. Cue the heart eyes emoji. But my luck didn't stop there. By some small miracle I had no plans for lunch or dinner that night. I made a quick calculation as to whether this good fortune outweighed the impropriety of going to the same restaurant twice in one day. It totally did and so I went. Don't judge. 

Among the many ridiculously delicious things I ate between my two outings (pork buns, shrimp buns, spicy noodles), it's the cucumber salad that's been occupying my daydreams. It's the kind of salad you want to eat a bucket of - crunchy, refreshing, salty, and spicy. I more or less did eat a bucket since the cucumbers were such a perfect foil to the rest of the rich, heavy fare we ordered. Although I had the good sense at the time to ask our server how it was made I did not have the good sense to write it down. Of what she shared all I recall is 1) it's finished with togarashi and 2) the dressing contains pureed scallions. Curiously though you use only the light and dark green parts. This stayed with me since it's the opposite of what I've been conditioned to do with scallions. 

I did a bit of Googling but the internet failed to turn up a recipe so below is my best attempt. Is it spot on? Of course not. I'm no David Chang. But it was pretty darn good and should hold me over until Momofuku sets up shop in Boston.

Cukes | www.hungryinlove.com
Spicy Cucumber Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Spicy Cucumber Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Cucumbers | www.hungryinlove.com
Spicy Cucumber Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Spicy Cucumber Salad | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

  • 4-6 mini seedless cucumbers (these require no peeling and have less water than the big honkers)
  • 2 scallions, roughly chopped (light and dark green parts only, toss the white bulb)
  • Handful cilantro leaves (about 1 cup, loosely packed)
  • 1 inch piece fresh ginger, peeled + roughly chopped
  • 5 Tbs. neutral oil (canola, peanut, or safflower)
  • 1 Tbs. rice vinegar
  • 1/2 cup almonds, toasted
  • 1 serrano chile, thinly sliced
  • Togarashi spice
  • Kosher salt

Prep

  • Chop cucumbers into small chunks (split in half and then slice crosswise into 1 inch pieces).
  • Line a colander with paper towels. Place cukes in colander and sprinkle generously with salt.
  • Let the cucumbers sit at room temperature (or in fridge)  for about 30 minutes. This will infuse flavor and also sweat out some water.
  • While you're waiting make your dressing. Place scallions, ginger, cilantro, oil, rice vinegar, and a pinch of salt in a blender. Puree until smooth and taste for seasoning.
  • Toast almonds in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant and beginning to brown. Let cool and then roughly chop.
  • When ready to dress and serve, pat cucumbers dry with a fresh paper towel.
  • Toss cukes, dressing, almonds, and serrano chile in a bowl. Transfer to a serving dish and garnish with togarashi and a few more almonds.

Vegetables, Snacks, Eggs

Morels On Toast With A Soft Boiled Egg

Morels On Toast With A Soft Boiled Egg | www.hungryinlove.com

Largely I consider it a boon that we live in an era where nearly all produce is available year round. I am a millennial after all. However there remain a few seasonal delicacies that aren't available on demand, and for that I'm grateful. It's an instant occasion when you have the chance to cook with an ingredient whose time is fleeting. Morels (or as I prefer, butter sponges) illustrate this little luxury best of all. They're delicate, earthy and have an affinity for butter, cream, and egg yolks. As it turns out we have a lot in common. In New England morels arrive in late April and stick around until early June. That's just enough time to enjoy them alongside gnochhi, stuffed in ravioli, and atop a pizza. Or for those times where instant gratification is in order, toast and an egg will do just fine.

Morels | www.hungryinlove.com
Bread | www.hungryinlove.com
Garlic Toast | www.hungryinlove.com
Morels on Toast | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

  • A handful of fresh morel mushrooms, cleaned (Note the morels pictured are not sliced in half lengthwise. You should do this though.)
  • A knob of butter
  • 1 sprig thyme
  • Your favorite bread for toasting
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 egg per toast
  • Sea salt & pepper

Prep

  • Set a small saucepan of water to boil for your egg(s).
  • While you're waiting for the water to boil, prepare your toast. Toast each bread slice then rub with a split clove of garlic. Set aside.
  • When water is boiling lower egg(s) in and reduce to a simmer. Set a timer for 6 minutes. (Six minutes of cook time yields my desired consistency, like the egg you see in the top photo. For a runnier yolk shorten to five minutes or a firmer yolk seven. After seven you'll be approaching hard-boiled territory.)
  • While your egg is boiling, cook your morels. Melt butter with thyme leaves over medium heat in a small saute pan. Add morels and cook until softened, about 5-7 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.
  • When your timer goes off remove your egg(s) with a slotted spoon and run under cold water before removing from the shell.
  • Assemble your morels on your toast(s) and top with a split open egg.
  • Enjoy immediately.

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Vegetables, Fixings

Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette

Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Fingerling Potatoes | www.hungryinlove.com
Platter | www.hungryinlove.com

Here's a pro tip to survive single digit New England weather - live in a tiny apartment and crank that oven! I know it's been 6 degrees in Cambridge all weekend but only because I've made necessary expeditions to the gym and the farmer's market. Otherwise I've been blissfully toasty holed up inside, using the arctic chill as an excuse to accomplish many important items on my to-do list. I successfully broke in our new-to-me vintage blanket (thanks Tuck!), watched The Sound of Music for the first time (shameful but it's true), and of course roasted a bunch of stuff.

With this spread I'm embracing the monochromatic hues that define February. I thought these vegetables might look a bit dull together but I actually think the end result of all those winter whites is quite elegant. There is one hint of sunshine - the orange zest in the vinaigrette. If you're tempted to skip this ingredient, don't. It makes everything bright and perfect.

If you're like me you didn't notice right away that this dish is both vegan and gluten-free. How about that. If you're into that sort of thing, take note. Otherwise you can just appreciate these vegetables label-free for being mighty delicious.

Fingerling Potatoes | www.hungryinlove.com
Fennel | www.hungryinlove.com
Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

Serves 4 as a side dish

Roasted Vegetables

  • 1/2 head cauliflower
  • 1 bulb fennel
  • 1 lb fingerling potatoes
  • 1 head of garlic
  • Olive oil, salt + pepper

Olive Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives, roughly chopped
  • 2 Tbs chopped parsley
  • 1 tsp grated orange zest
  • 3 Tbs red wine vinegar
  • 3 Tbs olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp (a pinch) sugar
  • Salt + pepper to taste

Prep

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • In a baking dish, toss whole potatoes with olive oil salt and pepper. Pop in oven and set timer for 45 minutes.
  • While potatoes are baking prep the cauliflower, fennel, and garlic. For the cauliflower, remove the stem and break head into small florets. I sliced florets in half so they would lay flat on a baking sheet and be closer in shape and size to the fennel. To prep the fennel, begin by removing stalks. (Reserve some of the fronds for garnish.) Stand bulb upright and slice into 1/2 inch thick slices lengthwise. For the garlic bulb simply cut into half crosswise so each clove is bisected. Lay all vegetables on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Use your hands to toss and coat. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Transfer baking sheet to oven along with potatoes. (I added the vegetables with 30 minutes to go on the timer. This worked out great. Both the potatoes and vegetables were done when the timer went off. Potatoes are done when easily pierced with a fork and the other veggies will be done when tender and nicely caramelized.)
  • While everything is roasting prep your vinaigrette.
  • In a small bowl mix all ingredients together except the salt and pepper. Depending on the olives you use, you may not need any. Taste and add seasoning to your liking.
  • Let vinaigrette sit 15-30 minutes at room temperature before serving to allow flavors to meld.
  • When potatoes and vegetables are done, remove from oven and allow to cool slightly before transferring to a serving platter.
  • Serve warm or at room temperature with olive vinaigrette.

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Vegetables

Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas

Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com

Do you roast broccoli? What about chickpeas? If you don't, you should start. Both are very roastable. You might have roasted chickpeas straight into snack territory before, but if you stop about halfway they'll be toasty on the outside and creamy on the inside, perfect for adding to salads. Roasted broccoli gets so nutty and crispy any bad broccoli memories you've been harboring will be instantly erased. This week I discovered that the two can do even more when sharing a sheet pan, namely make you dinner in one fell swoop. Roasted together the results are everything January should be - virtuous, warming, and restorative. All that and there's only one pan to clean up. If one of your new year's resolutions is to dirty fewer dishes this is a good place to start.

Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas| www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Broccoli + Chickpeas | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

  • 1 head broccoli or broccolini
  • 1 15 oz. can chickpeas, drained
  • 1 radish, thinly shaved
  • 6 oz feta, crumbled (see this post for my suggestions on scouting out good feta)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • Lemon wedge
  • Salt + pepper

Prep

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  • Trim broccoli and cut into small florets
  • In a bowl toss together broccoli, chickpeas, olive oil, salt and pepper until well coated
  • Spread on a baking sheet and pop in the oven to roast
  • At the 15 minute mark, use a spatula to toss
  • Return to oven and roast for another 15 minutes
  • When done chickpeas will be browned and toasted on the outside but still creamy on the inside; broccoli stems will be easily pierced with a fork and florets will be crispy
  • Transfer broccoli and chickpeas to a serving platter and scatter with radish and feta
  • Garnish with a squeeze of lemon and serve

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Snacks, Vegetables, Cheese

A Holiday Mezze Spread

Mezze Spread | www.hungryinlove.com
Mezze Spread | www.hungryinlove.com
Marinated Carrots | www.hungryinlove.com

Who's getting ready to host a party? I'm off duty this year but if I was it'd look like this. I've had mezze on the brain since my birthday last month. My fam and I went to one of my most favorite places in Cambridge, Sofra Bakery + Cafe, and ordered about three quarters of the menu. If you live within walking, driving, or flying distance I recommend you make a date to get your tush over there. (Pro tip: bring friends who are down to share. You're going to want it all.) Turkish, Lebanese, and Greek flavors get friendly on the menu and the results are otherworldly. I have not strolled through a bazaar with a fork but I imagine it would taste like this cafe.

Of all the feasting to be done at Sofra, the mezze plate is what really makes my heart flutter. Mezze simply means a sampling of small dishes - cheeses, spreads, salads + vegetables. A brightly hued platter of contrasting textures and flavors paired with warm bread might be my favorite way to eat. It was high time I attempted to compose my own. The brilliant mind behind Sofra, Ana Sortun, has kindly shared many of her secrets in her cookbook, Spice. The beets + yogurt and whipped feta are both renditions of Ana's recipes though I've made slight modifications to mix up flavor profiles and make prep less time-intensive.

There is nothing particularly holiday-y about this spread, except that it lends itself very well to a party. Not only can you make everything ahead, you should. The flavors will become more vibrant overnight and then you can tackle your party day to-do list (take out of fridge, let come to room temperature) with feet up and a glass of wine in hand.

PS - I gave myself an early Christmas present this week and rolled out a new word mark for the site. What do you think? The font is called 'smitten' which is appropriate because I am!

Beets + Yogurt | www.hungryinlove.com
Olives with Thyme + Orange | www.hungryinlove.com
Fried Pine Nuts | www.hungryinlove.com
Whipped Feta | www.hungryinlove.com
Marinated Carrots | www.hungryinlove.com
Beets + Yogurt | www.hungryinlove.com

Beets + Yogurt

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. beets
  • 8 oz. strained yogurt (labneh, yogurt cheese, or full fat Greek yogurt)
  • 1 Tbs. lemon juice
  • 1 Tbs. mint, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp. honey
  • salt + pepper to taste
  • olive oil + nigella seeds for garnish

Prep

  • Boil beets until easily pierced with a fork; remove from water and allow to cool (cooking time will vary based on size of your beets)
  • When beets are cool enough to handle, massage skins off under running water and discard
  • Using a box grater, finely grate beetroot (This is messy! Set you grater atop wax paper or another surface to protect your table or countertop)
  • Mix grated beets with yogurt, lemon juice, mint, honey, salt + pepper until well blended
  • Cover and refrigerate for at least 2 hours before serving
  • Serve at room temperature garnished with a drizzle of olive oil + nigella seeds

 

Cumin Marinated Carrots

Ingredients

  • 1 lb. carrots, peeled and sliced into coins
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp. maras pepper
  • 1 tsp. cumin seed
  • 1 tsp. kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp. lemon zest
  • 2 Tbs. lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup olive oil

Prep

  • Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil
  • Boil carrots until cooked through but not mushy (about 5-7 minutes)
  • While carrots are cooking use a mortar and pestle to mash garlic, maras, cumin, and salt into a paste
  • Drain carrots and place in bowl
  • Toss with garlic-spice paste, lemon juice, lemon zest, and olive oil until well coated
  • Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let marinate in refrigerator for at least 2 hours before serving
  • Serve at room temperature

 

Whipped Feta with Mint + Lemon

Ingredients

  • 8 oz. feta (ideally sheep's milk or goat's milk)
  • 2 Tbs. half + half (milk or cream may substitute)
  • 1 tsp. lemon zest
  • 2 Tbs. mint, finely chopped
  • 1-2 Tbs. pine nuts

Prep

  • In a food processor blend feta, half + half, lemon zest and mint on high speed until feta is smooth and fluffy (about 1 minute)
  • Transfer to a storage container and refrigerate before serving to all flavors to meld
  • When ready to serve fry pine nuts in a skillet with a glug of olive oil over medium high heat; stir constantly so as not to burn
  • Bring feta to room temperature and top with toasted pine nuts

 

Warm Olives with Orange + Thyme

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Kalamata olives
  • 6-8 strips orange zest
  • 1 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil

Prep

  • Toss olives, orange zest, thyme, and olive oil in a bowl
  • When ready to serve preheat oven to 375
  • Transfer olives to an oven-safe dish and heat until warmed through, about 10 minutes

 

Za'tar Flatbread

Ingredients

  • Dough for 1 pizza
  • 2 Tbs. za'tar spice blend
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. salt

Prep

  • Place a pizza stone in the oven + preheat oven to 500 degrees
  • Mix za'tar spice with olive oil and salt
  • Roll out pizza dough to desired thickness on a pizza board
  • Pierce dough all over with the tines of a fork
  • Brush olive oil + spice mixture all over dough right up to the edge of the flatbread
  • Transfer dough to pizza stone and bake 6-8 minutes (until edges are browned and dough is crisp)
  • Remove from oven and allow to cool
  • Cut into thin strips for dipping
  • Store leftover flatbread in a resealable plastic bag

Vegetables, Fixings

Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce

Tomaotes | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com

You know that daydream where you live on a farm nestled in a mountain valley? It's the one where you have a sprawling garden full of vegetables for eating and flowers for bouquets. You make butter from fresh cream to sell to your neighbors but also to spread on toast. You have an outdoor bathtub for sunset soaks and a cat to keep you company. Last weekend I stepped out of the daydream and onto Marisa Mauro's farm in Vermont. If it weren't for the fridge full of butter I came home with, I might not have known the difference.

You're probably guessing that all these gorgeous tomatoes came from Marisa's garden. We did pick tomatoes but those ended up in our bellies before I could take any snaps. No, the weekend involved serious homework for an article I'm so honored to write on Marisa's butter business, Ploughgate Creamery. Check out the upcoming issue of t.e.l.l. New England for all the details of Marisa's enviable Vermont farm life.

When Sunday arrived and it was time to go back to the dusty, cramped city I took home with me as much of Vermont as possible. Besides Marisa's butter that included hot sauce, gin, and of course maple syrup. I have long wanted to try roasting tomatoes with maple. I now regret not trying it sooner. If you can stand turning on your oven in August you won't either.

Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce | www.hungryinlove.com
Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce + Hand Cut Pasta | www.hungryinlove.com

Maple Roasted Tomato Sauce

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds tomatoes
  • 2 Tbs. pure maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. sea salt

Prep

  • Preheat oven to 300 degrees
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil
  • Chop tomatoes into chunks roughly the same size (I had some grape tomatoes so I left those whole)
  • Toss tomatoes with maple syrup, olive oil, and sea salt
  • Spread on baking sheet and roast for 1 hour
  • Pour tomatoes along with all juices from the baking sheet into a saucepan
  • Warm through when ready to serve

Serve sauce as is or add something briny like olives or capers to balance the sweetness.

Vegetables, Salads

Asparagus Salad

Asparagus Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Asparagus Salad Prep | www.hungryinlove.com
Asparagus Salad Prep | www.hungryinlove.com
Asparagus Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Asparagus Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Asparagus Salad | www.hungryinlove.com

I had the good fortune recently to spend a few delightful days with my grandparents in Georgia. Nana and Pops, as us kids call them. When Sunday came around Nana sent me home with this handsome little plate. Isn't she sweet? Happily unattached from the set to which she once belonged, I tucked her into my suitcase with visions of lunch for one. Nana would be pleased to see her gift getting some action these days, though she'd disapprove of this particular use. You see, Nana detests vegetables. They could be steamed, sous vide, hand-plucked, or wild-foraged  - it doesn't matter, she's not interested. I'll admit I did empathize with Nana the first time I heard the notion of raw asparagus salad. Sounds woody. And tough. I'm happy to report though that it's remarkably delicate, and dare I say, beats roasting. I won't go so far as to say this salad would convert my nana, but she's 91 so I'll give her a pass.

Asparagus Salad Aftermath | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

Serves 1
  • 8 asparagus spears
  • 2 Tbs. pine nuts, toasted
  • 1 egg
  • Vinegar
  • Pecorino cheese
  • Olive oil
  • Lemon wedge
  • Sea salt

Prep

  • Snap the woody end off asparagus spears. Using a vegetable peeler shave into ribbons leaving the tips intact. Add asparagus tips to to ribbons.
  • Toss asparagus with pine nuts, a dusting of grated Pecorino, a squeeze of lemon, a drizzle of olive oil and sea salt. Set aside.
  • To poach egg bring a small saucepan of water with a glug of vinegar to a simmer (the vinegar will keep the whites from dispersing).
  • Crack egg into a ramekin, keeping yolk intact 
  • Pour egg into the simmering water as close to the surface as possible (as opposed to letting it drop). Adjust heat if water is bubbling too vigorously.
  • Poach egg for 2 minutes (for a soft boil) or 4 minutes for a firmer yolk; remove from water with a slotted spoon
  • Let cool for a moment before topping salad with egg. Enjoy immediately.

Vegetables

Acorn Squash + Creamy Herb Farro

Acorn Squash Stuffed with Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com
Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com

Spring has sprung and brought with her today  a high of 28 degrees. Good grief. We're weary here in New England but I know, I know, old news.  I'd probably be numb to our situation if we hadn't just returned from a jaunt to Florida. There's nothing like a four day Vitamin-D binge to bring your state of deprivation into sharp focus. Well that and the fact that while I'm sporting flip flops and a maxi dress, the snowbird one seat over at brunch is cloaked in a turtleneck and a fleece. No lie.

But enough of that. In the spirit of the sunshine state, I'll turn to the bright side. March in New England has its charms and one is kitchen projects that involve cream sauce and melted cheese. Think of our poor neighbors to the south. Floridians have no business turning their ovens on in 80 degree weather. I'll bet there's but six weeks a year where roasted squash sounds like a good idea. The rest of the time they're left to get along on coconuts, strawberries, and rum runners. It's a pity, really, to not know the joys of hunkering.

This mish-mash was dreamed up one of those nights where the dinner selections looked positively drab. Wilty parsley = not inspiring. But you know what is? Mac + cheese. This farro will take you there. Except 'there', with all those whole grains and green speckles, will feel delightfully virtuous.

 Hello sunshine, my old friend. 

Hello sunshine, my old friend. 

Farro | www.hungyinlove.com
Acorn Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Acorn Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Acorn Squash Stuffed with Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com

Roasted Acorn Squash + Creamy Herb Farro

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 Acorn squash
  • Olive oli, salt, + pepper
  • 1 cup farro
  • 2 Tbs. butter 
  • 1 Tbs. flour
  • 1 Cup whole milk
  • 1 Cup grated Gruyere cheese + extra for sprinkling
  • 1 Cup chopped fresh herbs (I used parsley and basil)

Prep

  • Roast the Squash
    • Preheat oven to 400 degrees
    • Cut squash in half lengthwise (be careful, this part's a tad scary)
    • Scoop out seeds and discard (or save to roast)
    • Place halves on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt + pepper
    • Bake for one hour or until the flesh easily gives when pierced with a fork; remove from oven
  • Cook the Farro
    • Bring 6 cups of salted water to a rolling boil
    • Rinse farro and add to boiling water (You can cook farro like rice or like pasta; I prefer the pasta method so you eliminate the guessing game of getting the right grain to liquid ratio)
    • Cook farro at a boil for 20 minutes or until grains are tender
    • Drain
  • Make Cheese Sauce
    • In a heavy-bottomed saucepan melt butter over medium heat
    • Whisk in flour
    • Whisking regularly, cook over medium heat for 5-7 minutes until roux takes on a light brown color and becomes completely smooth; take care not to burn
    • Add milk whisking constantly until sauce begins to thicken
    • Turn heat to low and continue cooking, whisking regularly, for about 10 minutes until sauce is smooth and no longer tastes of flour
    • Add grated cheese and stir until melted and incorporated
    • Remove from heat
  • Assemble
    • Add cooked farro and fresh herbs to the cheese sauce and stir until well blended (you will have more of this mixture than you need to fill the squash, and that's is a good thing! It's awesome on its own and makes great leftovers)
    • Scoop farro into squash halves and garnish with grated Gruyere
    • Return squash to a 400 degree oven for 10-15 minutes, until cheese on top has melted and just browned
    • Serve hot

 

Vegetables

Swiss Chard with Pomegranate + Orange Yogurt

Swiss Chard with Orange Yogurt | www.hungryinlove.com
Swiss Chard | www.hungryinlove.com
Pomegranate | www.hungryinlove.com
Orange Zest | www.hungryinlove.com
Orange Honey Yogurt | www.hungryinlove.com

My oh my, 2014, you've outdone yourself! My heart grew three sizes this year. In approximate order of wonderfulness, highlights include:

  • Married the love of my life beneath raindrops in the place where we met and grew up
  • Welcomed a perfect child, my niece Tucker, into the world + fulfilled lifelong dream of becoming an Auntie Em
  • Stood beside three dear friends as they tied the knot
  • Serial binged
  • Started this here blog

2015 is feeling mighty intimidated right about now.

Swiss Chard with Pomegranate and Orange Honey Yogurt | www.hungryinlove.com

Despite my best attempts to assign some symbolic value to this swiss chard, there's really nothing about it that's representative of my year. Given the list above though, it would be a fool's errand if I tried. It is scientifically impossible to make a dish as delicious as my year has been. Instead I'll say this recipe is a nod to 2011, the year Yotam Ottolenghi's book Plenty came out and I learned how to bedazzle vegetables with pomegranate and yogurt.

Sauteed Swiss Chard with Pomegranate + Orange Yogurt

Serves 2-4 as a side dish

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch swiss chard
  • 2 Tbs. butter, divided
  • 1/3 cup white wine (water or stock may be substituted)
  • 1/4 cup pomegranate arils
  • 1/3 cup full fat, thick Greek yogurt (if you live in the Boston area I implore you to track down yogurt from Sophia's)
  • 1 Tbs. grated orange zest
  • 1 tsp. honey
  • S+P

Prep

  • Remove stems from chard
  • Chop chard stems into 1-2 inch pieces, set aside
  • Chop chard leaves into thin ribbons
  • Combine yogurt, orange zest, and honey; set aside
  • Heat 1 Tbs. butter in large saute pan over medium heat; add chard stems
  • Season with S+P; saute chard stems for ~3 minutes; add white wine
  • Continue to cook for 3-5 more minutes until wine has evaporated and stems are tender
  • Add remaining tablespoon of butter and chard leaves
  • Saute for 3-5 minutes until leaves are wilted and tender
  • Transfer chard to serving dish and top with pomegranate and healthy dollop of yogurt (Leftover pomegranate and yogurt? Breakfast is served.)