Pasta

Butternut Squash Gnocchi

Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com

When Tripp and I got married I told him that there was one condition under which I would permit him to file for a divorce: in the event I develop a gluten intolerance. Before you start thinking he's a crummy guy, let me explain. It is I who would become intolerable. My relationship with bread, pasta, cake and the like can pretty much be summed up by this Mariah Carey song  ("You've got me feeling emotions / Deeper than I ever dreamed of / Now you know the way you make me lose control / When you're looking into my eyes.") I'm actually aghast that I haven't posted a pasta recipe on this blog yet. So here begins what will surely be a robust section of this site.

This gnocchi has a couple steps but it's worth it. You start with an old clunker of a squash and end up with delicate little butternut-colored pasta pillows.  It's a beautiful thing.

Butternut Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi Dough | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com
Butternut Squash Gnocchi | www.hungryinlove.com
Find the recipe for this Parmesan Broth at BonAppetit.

Find the recipe for this Parmesan Broth at BonAppetit.

Butternut Squash Gnocchi

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups butternut squash puree (1 medium butternut squash + olive oil, salt, and pepper)
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 egg
  • Sage leaves
  • 4 Tbs. butter, divided
  • 1 Tbs. olive oil
  • 1 cup Parmesan Broth (we prepared this recipe from BonAppetit; if you don't feel like bothering with this, your pasta cooking water is a fine substitute)

Prep

Squash Puree

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees;
  • Cut butternut squash in half lengthwise and scoop out seeds
  • Place on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper
  • Roast until the flesh is easily pierced with a fork, about 45 minutes 
  • Scoop flesh out of squash and transfer to a food processor
  • Blend until smooth, 30-60 seconds; allow to cool; this may be done a day ahead (you may have a bit more than 1 1/2 cups - here are a few ideas from The Kitchn on how you can use any leftovers)

Gnocchi

  • In a mixing bowl, beat an egg into squash puree (use only 1 1/2 cups)
  • Gradually fold in flour (Note: dough will be soft. You want to add enough flour for the dough to just come together. If dough is still sticky after adding the full 2 cups of flour, continue adding one tablespoon at a time until it's workable.)
  • Turn dough onto a floured surface and knead gently until smooth
  • Using a sharp knife, cut dough into 8 equal sections
  • Take each section and using your palms roll into a long rope, about 1/2 inch thick
  • Cut the rope into 1/2 inch pieces and transfer the gnocchi to a floured surface (at this point you can pinch each gnocchi with the tines of a fork but I skipped this step)
  • Gnocchi may be used fresh or frozen; to freeze, spread gnocchi on a baking sheet so they are not touching and freeze until firm, about 1 hour; transfer frozen gnocchi to a zip lock bag for freezer storage

Sage Leaves

  • In a small saute pan heat 1 Tbs. butter and 1 Tbs. olive oil over medium heat
  • Add sage leaves (removed from stem) and fry 5-10 seconds until crisp - do not brown
  • Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate and sprinkle with salt

Assembly

  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil; have a large saute pan on another burner ready to go
  • Cook fresh gnocchi at a rolling boil until they float, about 3 minutes; remove gnocchi using a slotted spoon and drain
  • In a large saute pan, heat 3 Tbs. butter over medium heat
  • Once butter has melted, add cooked gnocchi and parmesan broth (substitute pasta cooking liquid if not using parmesan broth; you can also add a handful of finely grated parmesan at this step if you like)
  • Cook over medium high heat until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 5 minutes; the gnocchi will be lightly coated in sauce
  • Transfer gnocchi to serving dishes, garnish with fried sage leaves, and serve immediately