Jaunts

A Visit to The Butter Lady

From her barn, Marisa looks out over Vermont's Mad River Valley.

From her barn, Marisa looks out over Vermont's Mad River Valley.

Back in August I had the awesome pleasure of spending a weekend in Vermont with my friend Marisa Mauro to profile her butter business, Ploughgate Creamery, for t.e.l.l. New England. I shared a few of the juicy details in an earlier post here. As soon as I learned of t.e.l.l. (which is a simply gorgeous publication if you're unfamiliar) I had a vision of Marisa and her story gracing its pages. Marisa is a total badass, doing what most food-obsessed folks only dream of - contributing something incredible to our tables. If you enjoy the finer things in life, particularly in the morning with your toast, I highly recommend seeking out Marisa's cultured butter. Read on below for an excerpt and click through to t.e.l.l. New England for the full article.

The Resurrection of a Butter Farm

There is a farm in Fayston, Vermont whose vistas have been featured in many a postcard. The outlook offers sweeping views of the Mad River Valley, including Sugarbush’s two peaks engraved with ski trails. This is Bragg Farm where Marisa Mauro makes small-batch, cultured butter. Until recently Marisa had no idea that she is reviving a hundred-year old tradition on these grounds.

When I first met Marisa she had already started and lost her first successful small business. That operation was Ploughgate Creamery, located in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom. For three years she produced award-winning cheeses until a fire in September 2011 destroyed her facility. She was 26 years old. Following the loss, Marisa took a break from the dairy industry and didn’t have plans to return. Continue reading at t.e.l.l. New England.

Ploughgate Creamery | www.hungryinlove.com
Ploughgate Creamery | www.hungryinlove.com
Ploughgate Creamery | www.hungryinlove.com
Ploughgate Creamery | www.hungryinlove.com
Ploughgate Creamery | www.hungryinlove.com