parsley

Vegetables, Fixings

Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette

Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Fingerling Potatoes | www.hungryinlove.com
Platter | www.hungryinlove.com

Here's a pro tip to survive single digit New England weather - live in a tiny apartment and crank that oven! I know it's been 6 degrees in Cambridge all weekend but only because I've made necessary expeditions to the gym and the farmer's market. Otherwise I've been blissfully toasty holed up inside, using the arctic chill as an excuse to accomplish many important items on my to-do list. I successfully broke in our new-to-me vintage blanket (thanks Tuck!), watched The Sound of Music for the first time (shameful but it's true), and of course roasted a bunch of stuff.

With this spread I'm embracing the monochromatic hues that define February. I thought these vegetables might look a bit dull together but I actually think the end result of all those winter whites is quite elegant. There is one hint of sunshine - the orange zest in the vinaigrette. If you're tempted to skip this ingredient, don't. It makes everything bright and perfect.

If you're like me you didn't notice right away that this dish is both vegan and gluten-free. How about that. If you're into that sort of thing, take note. Otherwise you can just appreciate these vegetables label-free for being mighty delicious.

Fingerling Potatoes | www.hungryinlove.com
Fennel | www.hungryinlove.com
Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Vegetables + Olive Vinaigrette | www.hungryinlove.com

Ingredients

Serves 4 as a side dish

Roasted Vegetables

  • 1/2 head cauliflower
  • 1 bulb fennel
  • 1 lb fingerling potatoes
  • 1 head of garlic
  • Olive oil, salt + pepper

Olive Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 cup pitted Kalamata olives, roughly chopped
  • 2 Tbs chopped parsley
  • 1 tsp grated orange zest
  • 3 Tbs red wine vinegar
  • 3 Tbs olive oil
  • 1/4 tsp (a pinch) sugar
  • Salt + pepper to taste

Prep

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  • In a baking dish, toss whole potatoes with olive oil salt and pepper. Pop in oven and set timer for 45 minutes.
  • While potatoes are baking prep the cauliflower, fennel, and garlic. For the cauliflower, remove the stem and break head into small florets. I sliced florets in half so they would lay flat on a baking sheet and be closer in shape and size to the fennel. To prep the fennel, begin by removing stalks. (Reserve some of the fronds for garnish.) Stand bulb upright and slice into 1/2 inch thick slices lengthwise. For the garlic bulb simply cut into half crosswise so each clove is bisected. Lay all vegetables on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Use your hands to toss and coat. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Transfer baking sheet to oven along with potatoes. (I added the vegetables with 30 minutes to go on the timer. This worked out great. Both the potatoes and vegetables were done when the timer went off. Potatoes are done when easily pierced with a fork and the other veggies will be done when tender and nicely caramelized.)
  • While everything is roasting prep your vinaigrette.
  • In a small bowl mix all ingredients together except the salt and pepper. Depending on the olives you use, you may not need any. Taste and add seasoning to your liking.
  • Let vinaigrette sit 15-30 minutes at room temperature before serving to allow flavors to meld.
  • When potatoes and vegetables are done, remove from oven and allow to cool slightly before transferring to a serving platter.
  • Serve warm or at room temperature with olive vinaigrette.

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Salads

Grain, Grapefruit + Avocado Salad

Grain, Grapefruit, + Avocado Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Grain, Grapefruit + Avocado Salad | www.hungryinlove.com

It wasn't my intention but I may have struck breakfast salad gold with this one. How do I know? Because it's the first thing I've reached for three mornings in a row now. I suppose it makes sense. Several breakfast regulars are present: grapefruit, yogurt, avocado. Usually mornings find me stuffing one of these three in to my bag hoping it doesn't burst/explode/get smushed on my trek into the city. But together in a whole-grain studded salad the whole lot fits neatly into tupperware and becomes quite commuter friendly. That's worth waking up for if you ask me.

The prep for this, or any grain salad really, involves some legwork but the results are worth it. Besides being heartier than a green salad, cooked grains do a fabulous job at sopping up dressing, especially if left to refrigerate overnight. Here I used both quinoa and farro because I had them on hand. There's no magic to this combo though. You could skip one to simplify or swap in wheat berries, bulgur (cracked wheat), brown rice, or barley.

A few notes on cooking these grains. There are as many methods for cooking quinoa as there are grains in your pot. For this salad I used a 1:1.25 grain to water ratio and followed these tips from Food52. The results were perfectly fluffy. As for farro, I used to cook it as you do rice. But then I got hip to treating it like pasta and have never turned back. Simply cook at a rolling boil until it reaches your desired al dente-ness. Guess work eliminated!

Grain, Grapefruit, + Avocado Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Grain, Grapefruit + Avocado Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Farro | www.hungryinlove.com
Lime Yogurt Dressing | www.hungryinlove.com
Grain, Grapefruit, + Avocado Salad | www.hungryinlove.com
Serves 4-6

Ingredients

Grain, Grapefruit, + Avocado Salad

  • 1 cup cooked farro (1/2 cup dry)
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa (1/2 cup dry)
  • 1 grapefruit, peeled and sections removed from pith (Don't worry about keeping the sections in tact. You'll want to tear into bite-sized pieces for the salad.)
  • 1 avocado, cut into chunks
  • 4 scallions chopped (white and light green parts)
  • 1/2 head small radicchio
  • 2 Tbs chopped parsley

Lime Yogurt Dressing

  • 1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt (I prefer full fat but use what you like or have on hand)
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1/4 olive oil
  • Salt + pepper

Prep

  • Cook your grains and allow to cool.
  • Make your dressing. Whisk together yogurt, honey, lime juice, salt and pepper. Add olive oil and blend until smooth. I like to shake everything together in a ball jar - it makes for simple storage.
  • Assemble your salad. Tear radicchio leaves into your serving bowl.
  • Add cooled grains, chopped scallions, and parsley.
  • Add dressing and toss. (You likely will not need it all. Save the rest for another use.)
  • Taste grains for seasoning. Add more salt and pepper as necessary.
  • If you're preparing the salad to eat later, stop here. Cover and refrigerate. 
  • When ready to serve add grapefruit and avocado and toss gently. Enjoy!

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Vegetables

Acorn Squash + Creamy Herb Farro

Acorn Squash Stuffed with Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com
Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com

Spring has sprung and brought with her today  a high of 28 degrees. Good grief. We're weary here in New England but I know, I know, old news.  I'd probably be numb to our situation if we hadn't just returned from a jaunt to Florida. There's nothing like a four day Vitamin-D binge to bring your state of deprivation into sharp focus. Well that and the fact that while I'm sporting flip flops and a maxi dress, the snowbird one seat over at brunch is cloaked in a turtleneck and a fleece. No lie.

But enough of that. In the spirit of the sunshine state, I'll turn to the bright side. March in New England has its charms and one is kitchen projects that involve cream sauce and melted cheese. Think of our poor neighbors to the south. Floridians have no business turning their ovens on in 80 degree weather. I'll bet there's but six weeks a year where roasted squash sounds like a good idea. The rest of the time they're left to get along on coconuts, strawberries, and rum runners. It's a pity, really, to not know the joys of hunkering.

This mish-mash was dreamed up one of those nights where the dinner selections looked positively drab. Wilty parsley = not inspiring. But you know what is? Mac + cheese. This farro will take you there. Except 'there', with all those whole grains and green speckles, will feel delightfully virtuous.

Hello sunshine, my old friend. 

Hello sunshine, my old friend. 

Farro | www.hungyinlove.com
Acorn Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Roasted Acorn Squash | www.hungryinlove.com
Acorn Squash Stuffed with Creamy Herb Farro | www.hungryinlove.com

Roasted Acorn Squash + Creamy Herb Farro

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 Acorn squash
  • Olive oli, salt, + pepper
  • 1 cup farro
  • 2 Tbs. butter 
  • 1 Tbs. flour
  • 1 Cup whole milk
  • 1 Cup grated Gruyere cheese + extra for sprinkling
  • 1 Cup chopped fresh herbs (I used parsley and basil)

Prep

  • Roast the Squash
    • Preheat oven to 400 degrees
    • Cut squash in half lengthwise (be careful, this part's a tad scary)
    • Scoop out seeds and discard (or save to roast)
    • Place halves on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt + pepper
    • Bake for one hour or until the flesh easily gives when pierced with a fork; remove from oven
  • Cook the Farro
    • Bring 6 cups of salted water to a rolling boil
    • Rinse farro and add to boiling water (You can cook farro like rice or like pasta; I prefer the pasta method so you eliminate the guessing game of getting the right grain to liquid ratio)
    • Cook farro at a boil for 20 minutes or until grains are tender
    • Drain
  • Make Cheese Sauce
    • In a heavy-bottomed saucepan melt butter over medium heat
    • Whisk in flour
    • Whisking regularly, cook over medium heat for 5-7 minutes until roux takes on a light brown color and becomes completely smooth; take care not to burn
    • Add milk whisking constantly until sauce begins to thicken
    • Turn heat to low and continue cooking, whisking regularly, for about 10 minutes until sauce is smooth and no longer tastes of flour
    • Add grated cheese and stir until melted and incorporated
    • Remove from heat
  • Assemble
    • Add cooked farro and fresh herbs to the cheese sauce and stir until well blended (you will have more of this mixture than you need to fill the squash, and that's is a good thing! It's awesome on its own and makes great leftovers)
    • Scoop farro into squash halves and garnish with grated Gruyere
    • Return squash to a 400 degree oven for 10-15 minutes, until cheese on top has melted and just browned
    • Serve hot

 

Sea Food

Slow Roasted Cod + Salsa Verde

Slow Roasted Cod | www.hungryinlove.com
Salsa Verde | www.hungryinlove.com

When I was in 7th grade my father fulfilled a lifelong dream of his - owning a seaside cottage on Cape Cod. It had window boxes, shag carpet, and an outdoor shower. 800 square feet of paradise. His timing though was a bit unfortunate. You see, this new addition to our family coincided with the precise moment in my life when hanging out at the mall food court became ineffably more appealing than a weekend at the beach. Can you imagine the torture? Perhaps due to my exasperation over these new arrangements, it was around the same time that I swore off sea food all together (fish sticks had been on my approved list). That first summer was a steady succession of chicken sandwiches, sampled at every mid-Cape fish fry and clam shack we visited.

Fortunately I have graduated from my regrettable middle-school attitude and my sea food aversion. The little cottage is no longer ours, but my parents now live on the Cape year round so I make the pilgrimage from Boston regularly. These days each visit is an occasion to make amends with the lobster, mussels, chowder, and oysters I neglected in my youth. Sweet absolution.

In honor of my grown-up palate and Massachusettts' most beloved fish, I wanted to share this cod recipe. Last January, Bon Appetit introduced me to this slow-roasted salmon with citrus, fennel, and chiles, praising the 'low and slow' baking technique. I've never looked back. It produces divine results with fish of every stripe.


Salt Packed Capers | www.hungryinlove.com

I prefer salt-packed capers to those in brine. The flavor is more herbal than vinegary, and they can live in the cupboard, freeing up valuable fridge real estate.

Slow Roasted Cod | www.hungryinlove.com
Slow Roasted Cod | www.hungryinlove.com

 

Slow Roasted Cod

Ingredients

Serves 2-3 (can easily be doubled or tripled)
  • 1 lb. fresh cod filet (Salmon or another white fish like halibut would make good substitutes.)
  • 1 Tbs. whole capers (If packed in salt, rinse well)
  • 1 Tbs. finely diced preserved lemon rind (Follow the link for instructions on making your own, or pick some up here.)
  • 1 red chile (The jar of preserved lemons we had included a beautiful mirasol pepper; we tossed it in since we like a little heat but it's not essential)
  • 1/3 cup olive oil (This amount can be reduced. Really the fish should just be well coated. We like a heavy pour so we can dip bread in the warm, infused oil)

Prep

  • Place fish in a baking dish and salt; let sit for 30 minutes or so to come to room temperature
  • Preheat oven to 250 degrees
  • Rinse capers and dice preserved lemon
  • Pour olive oil over fish and scatter with capers and preserved lemon
  • If using chile, place in baking dish
  • Bake for 30-35 minutes until cooked through (when pierced with a fork or knife fish will flake and be opaque)
  • Top with salsa verde and serve immediately

 

Salsa Verde

Salsa verde is awesome on fish, and equally if not more awesome for bread dunking while you slow roast. This is Alice Water's recipe with orange zest swapped in for lemon. Both are great.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup chopped parsley

  • Zest of one orange (lemon zest is more traditional but we had an orange on hand)

  • 1 Tbs. capers, rinsed and finely chopped

  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

  • 1/3 cup olive oil

Prep

  • Combine all ingredients and let sit for 30 minutes or more for flavors to come together
  • Taste for salt before serving; depending on your capers you may or may not need it